Conquering the White Cliffs of Dover

Our trip to Dover is one of my most memorable experiences.  Besides having a great time with friends, it was a physically challenging trip as we had to walk around 16 kilometers, on a cold, windy day, along the coastal path in order to get the best view of the famous white cliffs.  The high chalk cliffs look out onto the English Channel, giving far-reaching views towards the French coast.  Indeed,  it is a magnificent coastal site overlooking the English Channel.

The cliffs have great symbolic value in Britain because they face towards Continental Europe across the narrowest part of the English Channel, where invasions have historically threatened and against which the cliffs form a symbolic guard. Because crossing at Dover was the primary route to the continent before the advent of air travel, the white line of cliffs also formed the first or last sight of England for travellers.  (Source:  Wikipedia)

Meeting at the station and off we go!

A bit of a hilly climb and we are on the footpath…

First stop:  lunch.  We were so hungry that nobody bothered to take photos of our food!  After a satisfying meal, we relaxed a bit. We were carefree and very excited.  Little did we know of the long, long, long, walk ahead of us.
Meeting the great white cliffs.
I had to crawl to the edge of the cliff to get this full shot.

I had to crawl to the edge of the cliff to get this full shot.

What are the White Cliffs of Dover made from?  The cliffs are made from chalk, a soft white, very finely grained pure limestone, and are commonly 300-400m deep. The chalk layers built up gradually over millions of years.They’re formed from the skeletal remains of minute planktonic green algae that lived floating in the upper levels of the ocean. When the algae died, their remains sank to the bottom of the ocean and combined with the remains of other creatures to form the chalk that shapes the cliffs today.  Over millions of years, the seabed became exposed and is now above sea level. The resulting edge of chalk is the iconic White Cliffs of Dover.
It was tricky to get this shot.

It was tricky to get this shot.

Afternoon tea after that long hike!  And still a long way to go to get back to ground level!
 FINALLY!  We are going downhill….and still a lot of walking to do before we get to the train station!  When will the walking end?

Time to rest….again!

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Watching people flying the kite

Even after a very long day, the team was still in high spirits as we set off back to London.

7 thoughts on “Conquering the White Cliffs of Dover

  1. Thanks for ‘pinging my post’! We have walked and crawled in the same places. Odd to stumble over (figuratively) someone I don’t know who has flattened the same blades of grass. That was a hefty walk you and your friends did in one day. Did some swimming there in August. We are going back soon, to hunt for fossils. Good luck on your health quest. I’m on the same quest. I’ve just joined a gym again. Last one I stepped into was 30 years ago. I’m 62 now. Ann

  2. Pingback: An Enchanting Stay at Ellenborough Park, Cheltenham | My Green Juice

  3. Pingback: An Enchanting Stay at Ellenborough Park, Cheltenham | Travel Tales of a Yogini

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